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2007 Pacific Typhoon Season Storms(as of October 06, 2007)

 Typhoon Kong-rey

 
Typhoon Kong-rey
Typhoon 01W
2
TY Kong-rey07.jpg Kong-rey 2007 track.png
Duration March 30April 6, 2007
Intensity 80 kt (10-min), 960 hPa[2]

On March 26, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) identified a broad area of low pressure in the Western North Pacific. It moved west-northwestward over the next few days, slowly gaining organization. According to the Japan Meteorological Agency, it became a tropical depression on March 30. The next day, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert due to an increased consolidation of the low-level circulation of the system. The JTWC issued its first warning on Tropical Depression 01W late that evening local time. As it continued to strengthen, the JTWC upgraded it to a tropical storm, the first of the season. The JMA followed suit, and named the system Kong-rey. The name was submitted by Cambodia, and refers to a character in a Khmer legend, which is also the name of a mountain.[3]

Kong-rey continued to organize and intensified into a severe tropical storm early the next morning local time. The JTWC then upgraded it to a typhoon on April 2. As the system took a more poleward track towards the Northern Mariana Islands, the National Weather Service office in Guam noted that damaging winds were now not expected on the island. Elsewhere in the Marianas, preparations were made and flights were cancelled in anticipation of the typhoon. Kong-rey passed through the islands in the early hours of the morning on April 3 local time. The JMA upgraded Kong-rey to a typhoon later that afternoon, as it developed an eye. It strengthened slightly further before encountering wind shear and colder sea surface temperatures and was downgraded back to a severe tropical storm on April 4. As Kong-rey accelerated towards the northeast, it began undergoing extratropical transition early on April 5 and the JTWC issued its final warning. The JMA issued its final warning on the morning of April 6 after it had completed extratropical transition. No casualties or major damage was reported.

Typhoon Yutu (Amang)

Typhoon Yutu (Amang)
Typhoon 02W
4
TY Yutu 2007 MODIS May 20.jpg Yutu 2007 track.png
Duration May 15May 23, 2007
Intensity 95 kt (10-min), 935 hPa

On May 15, a significant consolidation of organisation in a tropical disturbance located south-southeast of Guam led to Dvorak technique numbers equating to a windspeed of 45 kt from the Air Force Weather Agency. Later that day, the Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system a tropical depression, and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert.[4] The next day, the JMA began issuing full advisories on the tropical depression. It developed slowly, resulting in a reissuance of the TCFA later that day. In this second TCFA, the JTWC noted "an increasingly well-defined" low-level circulation centre.[5] The JTWC upgraded the system to Tropical Depression 02W at 1200 UTC, based on satellite intensity estimates and QuikSCAT.[6]

The JMA designated 02W as Tropical Storm Yutu early on May 17, as the system strengthened further. The name 'Yutu' was contributed by China, and refers to a rabbit in a Chinese fable.[3] The JTWC followed suit 3 hours later, upgrading the system to Tropical Storm 02W as it moved quickly westwards, heading for Yap. Tropical storm warnings and watches were put in place for most of the Federated States of Micronesia, but were later cancelled after Yutu passed through quickly.

It then took a northwesterly turn, entered the PAGASA area of responsibility on May 18 as it reached severe tropical storm strength,[7] and was named "Amang". Later that day, the JTWC upgraded it to a typhoon, and identified a "distinct eye feature",[8] and the JMA upgraded the severe tropical storm to a typhoon at 1800 UTC as it continued to intensify. It began to recurve towards Iwo Jima, undergoing rapid intensification,[9] with "enhanced poleward outflow and low vertical wind shear".[10] It reached its peak on the evening of May 20, as a strong Category 4-equivalent typhoon, just short of becoming a super typhoon.

Despite moving into cooler waters, its strong poleward outflow helped it to maintain a high intensity, while carrying a 20 nautical mile-wide eye, on the early morning of May 21.[11] It then began to gradually weaken, passing over Okinotorishima and near Iwo Jima that day as it sped off to the northeast. Maximum winds on Iwo Jima occurred around 1500 UTC that day, with 66 kt (122 km/h, 76 mph) sustained gusting to 104 kt (193 km/h, 120 mph), when a minimum central pressure of 976 hPa was recorded.[12] It then started extratropical transition, and the JTWC issued its final warning on the morning of May 22. The JMA issued its last advisory after extratropical transition completed a day later.

Tropical Storm Toraji

Tropical Storm Toraji
Tropical Storm 03W
TS
Toraji 05 july 2007 0230Z.jpg Toraji 2007 track.png
Duration July 2July 6, 2007
Intensity 35 kt (10-min), 994 hPa

An area of disturbed weather formed in the South China Sea on July 2 and gradually consolidated over the next two days as it moved west-northwestward. A Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert was issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning Centre on the morning of July 4, and later that day the disturbance was upgraded straight to a tropical storm just south-east of Hainan Island. It made landfall on the island shortly after. China claimed that a tropical depression formed in the morning on July 2, made landfall in Hainan later that afternoon with maximum sustained winds of 15 m/s (55 km/h, 35 mph)[13] and deepened to 988hPa[14] before making its second landfall. In response to the storm, Guangxi evacuated nearly 147 thousand people.[15]

The Japan Meteorological Agency upgraded the tropical depression to Tropical Storm Toraji on the morning of July 5 while it was in the Gulf of Tonkin, after the centre of the storm had emerged back over water. The name Toraji was contributed by North Korea and refers to the broad bellflower (platycodi radix).

Toraji made landfall in Vietnam around 1200 UTC later that evening, having not strengthened much while over the Gulf of Tonkin. The JMA never analysed the storm beyond 994 hPa and minimal tropical storm strength. The JTWC issued its last advisory after landfall, and the JMA followed suit shortly after.

Typhoon Man-yi (Bebeng)

Typhoon Man-yi (Bebeng)
Super Typhoon 04W
4
Man-Yi 12 july 2007 0505Z.jpg Man-yi 2007 track.png
Duration July 7July 17, 2007
Intensity 95 kt (10-min), 930 hPa

The Naval Research Laboratory began to track an area of disturbed weather just north of the equator on July 4. The circulation centre and surrounding convection started to take shape, although the system was in a "marginal upper-level environment" with moderate vertical wind shear.[16][17] Surface pressure drops of less than 0.5 mb (hPa) were observed on July 6, as the system moved westward.[17] Early on July 7, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) listed the system as a weak tropical depression. Hours later, the Joint Typhoon Warning Centre (JTWC) issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert, as the system consolidated further with "deep convective banding" and improving upper-level conditions.[18]

The JTWC issued its first warning on Tropical Depression 04W later that day,[19] and forecast a gradual intensification, as weak to moderate wind shear and weak poleward outflow balanced the effect of high ocean heat content.[20] The JMA began issuing full tropical cyclone advisories on the tropical depression at the same time.[21] As the depression gained more organisation, it was upgraded to a tropical storm that night by the JTWC.[22] The JMA finally upgraded it to a tropical storm later that evening as the large system consolidated, naming it Man-yi.[23] The name "Man-yi" was contributed by Hong Kong, and is the Chinese name of a strait turned reservoir (the High Island Reservoir). Man-yi continued to organize and became a severe tropical storm on July 9, when downed electricity lines caused widespread power outages on Guam.[24] Tropical storm warnings and typhoon watches were put in place for most of Yap State at some point during the storm. Strong waves from the typhoon capsized a ship 375 miles to the northwest of Guam, killing three and leaving six missing.[25]

The JTWC upgraded the storm to a typhoon on the afternoon of July 10, based on Dvorak technique satellite intensity estimates of 65 kt by both the JMA and the JTWC. Early the next day, the system entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility and was named "Bebeng" by PAGASA. At the same time, the JMA upgraded Man-yi to a typhoon.

Moving over warmer waters, Man-yi underwent rapid deepening late on July 11 and early on July 12 as it churned towards Okinawa in Japan. The United States Military upgraded the Tropical Cyclone Condition of Readiness (TCCOR) levels for Kanto, Yokosuka, Sasebo and Okinawa on the afternoon of July 12 as Man-yi neared the islands.[26] Man-yi was upgraded twice to super-typhoon strength over the next day as it passed through the prefecture. The passage of Man-yi resulted in 37 injuries and widespread power outages in Okinawa.[27] The TCCOR level for Okinawa was downgraded to 1R (recovery) on July 13 while Kanto, Yokosuka and Sasebo's levels were all upgraded in anticipation of the typhoon.[28] Man-yi made brief landfall in Kagoshima Prefecture on Kyūshū early the next day before turning to the east and making brief landfalls in Kōchi Prefecture on Shikoku and in Wakayama Prefecture on Honshū.

As it interacted with land and started to undergo extratropical transition, the typhoon weakened and was downgraded to a tropical storm by the JTWC and a severe tropical storm by the JMA. It became extratropical on July 15 according to the JTWC and hence it issued its final advisory. The JMA issued its final advisory two days later.

Typhoon Usagi

Typhoon Usagi
Typhoon 05W
4
Usagi 01 aug 2007 0125Z.jpg
Duration July 27August 4, 2007
Intensity 90 kt (10-min), 945 hPa

On July 26, the Naval Research Laboratory identified an area of disturbed weather east of the Mariana Islands. This area moved westward and increased in organization, and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert on the system on July 27.[29] The Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system a tropical depression later that day.[30] The next day, the JMA began issuing advisories on the depression, and the JTWC followed suit, designating it Tropical Depression 05W.[31]

The system quickly strengthened as it approached the Mariana Islands, and the JTWC upgraded it to a tropical storm six hours later.[32] The JMA did so early on July 29, designating the system as Tropical Storm Usagi.[33] The name Usagi was contributed by Japan, and means "rabbit" in Japanese.[3] The National Weather Service office in Guam issued tropical storm warnings for Pagan Island and Agrihan in the Northern Marianas shortly after the system was upgraded.[34]

Usagi passed between Pagan and Agrihan later on July 29,[35] and began to quickly strengthen. The JTWC upgraded it to a typhoon later that day, citing Dvorak technique numbers indicating an estimate of 65 knots (120 km/h, 75 mph) and a developing eye.[36] The system gradually turned toward the northwest, and the JMA upgraded it to a severe tropical storm early on July 30,[37] and then to a typhoon on July 31 as it passed to the south of Iwo Jima.[38] Usagi moved northwest over warm waters, reaching peak intensity on August 1 before weakening due to cooling sea surface temperatures and increasing wind shear as it approached Kyūshū. Usagi made landfall on August 2 near Nobeoka, Miyazaki as a rapidly weakening typhoon, and it was downgraded to a severe tropical storm shortly after. The system continued weakening rapidly as it moved across Kyūshū and Honshū, and the JMA downgraded it to a tropical storm later that day.[39]

The JTWC downgraded the system to a tropical storm late on August 2 and issued its last advisory early on August 3 as it began to undergo extratropical transition. Usagi then made further landfalls on northern Honshū in Aomori Prefecture before becoming fully extratropical on August 4, leading the JMA to stop advisories. Usagi was responsible for 18 injuries in Kyūshū.[40]

Typhoon Pabuk (Chedeng)

Typhoon Pabuk (Chedeng)
Typhoon 07W
1
Pabuk 07 aug 2007 0107Z.jpg
Duration August 4August 9, 2007
Intensity 65 kt (10-min), 975 hPa

A tropical disturbance developed southeast of Chuuk early on July 31. The system moved west-northwestward over the next several days with little change in organization. On August 4, however, organized convection quickly began to redevelop, and the Japan Meteorological Agency began monitoring it as a tropical depression. The system continued to strengthen, and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert on the system early the next day, noting that its environment was "strongly favorable for development".[41] The Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system Tropical Storm Pabuk shortly after.[42] The name "Pabuk" was submitted by Laos, and refers to a large freshwater fish in the Mekong River.[3] The JTWC designated the system Tropical Storm 07W at about the same time, and on August 5 PAGASA named the system Chedeng. As Pabuk continued to move to the northwest, it gained some organisation as it slowly developed outflow.[43] It was upgraded by the JMA to a severe tropical storm on August 6. Moving westwards towards Taiwan, an area of convection south of Pabuk separated and formed its own low-level circulation. Pabuk's upper-level outflow inhibited this new area of convection. Strengthening slightly, Pabuk was upgraded to a typhoon on the morning of August 7. The JTWC downgraded Pabuk to a tropical storm later that day, with the JMA downgrading Pabuk shortly before landfall. It made landfall in southern Taiwan around 1630 UTC according to Taiwan radar and crossed the southern tip of the Hengchun Peninsula in Pingtung County. The JTWC re-upgraded Pabuk to a typhoon at its next advisory, however, citing a small eye at landfall,[44] before downgrading it to a tropical storm again three hours later.[45]

After passing over Taiwan, Pabuk took aim at Hong Kong.[46] The Hong Kong Observatory and Macau's Meteorological and Geophysical Bureau both hoisted strong wind signal 3 on August 9 as the system passed to the south of Hong Kong. The JMA downgraded the storm to a tropical depression later that day and issued its final public advisory, with the JTWC following suit shortly after. The tropical depression then turned back to the east-northeast on August 10[47], forcing the HKO to re-issue signal 3. The HKO also warned that winds were expected to strengthen further locally, and that the Hong Kong Education Bureau had suspended all classes for the day.[48] The HKO upgraded Pabuk to a tropical storm[49] and subsequently issued the gale or storm warning signal 8 at 2:30 p.m. HKT (0630 UTC) later that day as Pabuk moved closer to the territory.[50] This was replaced by signal 3 later that night as Pabuk took another turn in direction and headed west inland into Guangdong. Early next morning, Pabuk resumed a northeasterly track, edging once again closer to the Pearl River Delta[51] before it weakened further and HKO cancelled all signals.[52]

At least 11 people were killed in the Philippines by Pabuk.[53]

Tropical Storm Wutip (Dodong)

Tropical Storm Wutip (Dodong)
Tropical Storm 08W
TS
Tropical Storm Wutip 2007 MODIS.jpg
Duration August 8August 9, 2007
Intensity 40 kt (10-min), 990 hPa

A tropical disturbance developed to the south of the developing Tropical Storm Pabuk on August 5, and was first mentioned by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center in its Significant Tropical Weather Outlook on August 6.[54] The Japan Meteorological Agency designated it a tropical depression later that night.[55] By the next day, although still attached to Pabuk and being inhibited by shearing from an upper-level outflow anticyclone over Pabuk,[56] the JTWC issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert.[57] As Pabuk moved away, the depression gradually strengthened, and the JMA designated it Tropical Storm Wutip early on August 8.[58] The name Wutip was submitted by Macau, and means butterfly.[3] It struggled against land interaction, however, and did not strengthen considerably, remaining poorly organised. The storm quickly weakened, and the JMA issued its last advisory on Wutip early on August 9, downgrading it to a tropical depression. The JTWC issued its last advisory shortly after.

Three people were killed and 17 others injured in the Philippines by Tropical Storm Wutip.[59]

Typhoon Sepat (Egay)

Typhoon Sepat (Egay)
Super Typhoon 09W
5
Sepat 16 aug 2007 0225Z.jpg
Duration August 11August 20, 2007
Intensity 110 kt (10-min), 910 hPa
 

An area of disturbed weather developed west of the Northern Mariana Islands on August 11. Early the next day, the JMA began issuing advisories on the depression,[60] and the JTWC followed suit, designating it Tropical Depression 09W.[61] Twelve hours later, the JTWC upgraded the tropical depression to a tropical storm[62] based on Dvorak technique satellite intensity estimates and[63] the storm exhibiting tightly-curved convective bands. An upper-level low helped to reduce wind shear that had been affecting the storm.[63] The JTWC also warned of the possibility of rapid intensification.[63] The JMA upgraded the depression to a tropical storm later that day[64] and named it Sepat, a name contributed by Malaysia referring to a freshwater fish species.[3]

By early on August 13, Sepat had moved into PAGASA's area of responsibility and attained the local name "Egay". The JMA upgraded Sepat to a severe tropical storm shortly after.[65] Late that night, Sepat underwent rapid intensification as expected, and was upgraded by the JTWC to a super typhoon the next morning.[66] Sepat slowed in forward speed and took a turn from a west-southwest motion to a more poleward one.[67] Continuing to intensify,[68] Sepat reached a peak minimum central pressure of 910 hPa on the morning of August 16.[69] High ocean heat content and good equatorward outflow allowed Sepat to maintain its intensity, but an eyewall replacement cycle began later that night, resulting in weakening.[70] It made landfall in eastern Taiwan between Taitung and Hualien on the morning of August 18 local time at around 5 a.m. (2100 UTC August 17)[71] and weakened to a minimal typhoon.[72] After crossing the island, Sepat held on to minimal typhoon intensity before weakening to a severe tropical storm that night.[73] It made a second landfall, in mainland China, about 24 hours after landfall on Taiwan and was downgraded to a tropical storm the next morning. It further weakened inland and the JMA issued its final advisory on the morning of August 20.

On August 15, monsoon rains brought by Typhoon Sepat flooded and paralyzed traffic in Metro Manila.[74] Classes and services in government offices were suspended until August 17.[75]

Typhoon Fitow

Typhoon Fitow
Typhoon 10W
2
Fitow 04 sept 2007 0115Z.jpg
Duration August 29September 8, 2007
Intensity 65 kt (10-min), 965 hPa

On August 28, an area of disturbed weather that had lingered east-northeast of Saipan became better organised. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center initiated warnings on Tropical Depression 10W the next morning,[76] and the JMA initiated advisories on a tropical depression the same day.[77] Under favourable conditions, the system intensified quickly, becoming Tropical Storm Fitow by afternoon [78] and a severe tropical storm by the evening of August 29. [79] Intensification continued, and Fitow became a typhoon early on August 30.[80] Fitow made landfall near Tokyo, Japan late on September 6[81][82] The JMA downgraded Fitow to a severe tropical storm early on September 7[83], and a tropical storm later that day.[84] The cyclone degenerated into a remnant low on September 8.[85]

In Japan, seven people were killed.[86]

Severe Tropical Storm Danas
Severe Tropical Storm Danas
Tropical Storm 11W
STS
20070909.2330.gms6.x.vis1km.11WDANAS.55kts-982mb-366N-1488E.100pc.jpg
Duration September 6September 11, 2007
Intensity 50 kt (10-min), 994 hPa

A disturbed area of weather northwest of Wake Island formed early on September 3 and tracked north then northwest, becoming more organised, and on September 6 was recognised as a full tropical depression by the JMA. [87] A TCFA was issued on the same day.[88] The storm continued northwest-ward toward Japan, becoming Tropical Storm Danas early on September 7.[89] The storm slowed its westward movement and headed north, and then northeast, becoming a severe tropical storm on September 9.[90] By the 11th, cooler waters had weakened the storm down to a tropical storm[91] and the storm degenerated into a remnant low later that day.[92]

Typhoon Nari (Falcon)

Typhoon Nari (Falcon)
Typhoon 12W
4
Nari 15 sept 2007 0235Z.jpg
Duration September 13September 17
Intensity 100 kt (10-min), 935 hPa

An area of disturbed weather developed northwest of Guam on September 10 and moved northwestward, slowly increasing in organisation. The Japan Meteorological Agency began monitoring the system as a tropical depression the next day. The depression continued to organise and strengthen, and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert on it during the afternoon of September 12, and began issuing advisories on Tropical Depression 12W an hour later. The JMA followed suit early on September 13 and initiated advisories on the system; PAGASA named the system Falcon shortly after. The depression continued to intensify, and the JMA upgraded it to Tropical Storm Nari later that morning. The storm then underwent rapid intensification that afternoon and evening, strengthening from a tropical depression to a typhoon in just 18 hours. The JMA upgraded Nari to a severe tropical storm late that afternoon, and by late that evening, Nari was upgraded to a typhoon. Nari reached its peak on September 14th, and began weakening soon afterwards. It turned extratropical right after landfall in South Korea at tropical storm strength. at least 20 people have been killed or are missing due to the flooding caused by Nari. Rainfall totals reached a record 590mm in Jeju, South Korea. The name Nari was submitted by South Korea, and means lily.[3]

Typhoon Wipha (Goring)

Typhoon Wipha (Goring)
Super Typhoon 13W
4
Wipha 18 sept 2007 044Z cropped.jpg
Duration September 14September 19
Intensity 100 kt (10-min), 930 hPa

An area of disturbed weather formed southeast of Naha, Okinawa early on September 13. This area gradually became better organised, and a TCFA was issued late on September 14.[93] The JMA upgraded the storm to a tropical depression on September 15,[94] and the JTWC soon followed suit with Tropical Depression 13W.[95] PAGASA named the storm "Goring" later that day. On September 16, the storm had gained enough organisation to be designated as a tropical storm.[96] On September 17, the storm underwent rapid intensification and quickly strengthened into a typhoon. It continued to strengthen rapidly and was upgraded by the JTWC to a super typhoon early on September 18. In the early hours, local time, of September 19, Wipha slammed into Fuding, near the Fujian-Zhejiang provincial border in China. However, before the storm made landfall it weakened slightly, becoming a Category 3-equivalent typhoon.

Wipha originally threatened to pass over Shanghai, which would have made it the most destructive Chinese typhoon in over a decade. However, it veered to the south, making a direct impact unlikely. Throughout the Shanghai and Fujian-Zhejiang area, nearly 2 million persons evacuated, including 1.5 million in Zhejiang and 291 thousand from low-lying areas, due to the threat from Wipha. The Xinhua News Agency considered the evacuations to be the region's most extensive in over a half century.[86]

Boats, ferries, and ships were called back in to port to take refuge in harbors. At both airports in Shanghai, at least twenty flights were canceled and fifty postponed.[86] The typhoon also caused FIFA to reschedule four matches in the Women's World Cup. [97]

Flooding was severe. In the area, at least 80 streets were flooded. An unidentified man was killed when he entered floodwater that had been charged by an appliance. The flooding also brought water levels in several rivers and reservoirs to dangerous levels.[86] In total, nine people were killed and damage was estimated at over $880 million (USD).[98]

Tropical Storm Francisco

Tropical Storm Francisco
Tropical Storm 15W
TS
Francisco 24 sept 2007 0314Z.jpg
Duration September 23September 25
Intensity 45 kt (10-min), 990 hPa

An area of disturbed weather formed about 190 nm south-southeast of Hong Kong early on September 19. It was recognised as a minor tropical depression by the JMA on the 21st, and upgraded to a full depression on the 23rd.[99] The JTWC recognised Tropical Depression 15W at the same time.[100] Nine hours after being delcared a full depression, the JMA and the JTWC upgraded it to Tropical Storm Francisco.[101][102] The storm traveled due west and over Wenchang on Hainan Island on September 24. Land interaction and moderate wind shear caused Francisco to weaken to a tropical depression as warnings were discontinued.[103][104][105] The name 'Francisco' was submitted by the United States and is a common Chamorro man's name.[106]

Severe Tropical Storm Lekima (Hanna)

Severe Tropical Storm Lekima (Hanna)
Typhoon 16W
1
Lekima 03 oct 2007 0306Z.jpg
Duration September 27October 4
Intensity 60 kt (10-min), 975 hPa

An area of disturbed weather near the Philippines gradually developed. PAGASA was first to upgrade it, declaring it Tropical Depression Hanna on September 27, and upgrading it to a tropical storm the next day. It made landfall in central Luzon early on September 29, and shortly thereafter the JMA declared the system Tropical Storm Lekima. It continued to strengthen and was upgraded to a severe tropical storm on September 30 (the JTWC upgraded it to a typhoon) and remained at such until landfall. It dissipated over land on October 4.

Tropical Storm Lekima brought heavy rains to Luzon causing a landslide that killed eight people, including three children, in Ifugao province, while another person was found dead in Quezon City.[107][108] Torrential rains also caused landslides, flooding, infrastructure damage, and disruption of transportation service in other parts of the country.[107][108] Over 100,000 people were evacuated in southern China as the storm approached, and more than 20,000 fishing boats were recalled back to the harbors.[109]

On October 3, Lekima made landfall in Vietnam as a severe tropical storm. Hundreds of houses were destroyed in Vietnam and five people were reported to have died as a result of the storm.[110]

Typhoon Krosa (Ineng)

Typhoon Krosa (Ineng)
Super Typhoon 17W
4
Krosa 04 oct 2007 0440Z.jpg
Current storm status
Typhoon (JMA)
Current storm status
Category 4 super typhoon (1-min mean)
As of: 1500 UTC October 5
Location: 22.4N 124.6E
As of 1200 UTC:
305 nm (565 km, 350 mi) SSW of Naha, Okinawa
Winds: 105 kt (195 km/h, 120 mph) average (10-min mean)
130 kt (240 km/h, 150 mph) sustained (1-min mean)
gusting to 150 kt (280 km/h, 175 mph)
Pressure: 925 hPa
Movement: NNW at 10 kt (20 km/h, 12 mph)
See more detailed information.

In late September, a new system formed east of the Philippines. PAGASA declared it a tropical depression (Ineng) early on October 1, and the JMA and JTWC soon followed. It was upgraded to a tropical storm early on October 2, named Krosa. Rapid intensification took place on October 2 and it was upgraded to a typhoon by the JTWC by midday. As it intensified, it gained a wide, ragged eye and began to track to the west, becoming a typhoon by the JMA early on October 3. It continued to rapidly intensify that day before leveling off as a Category 4-equivalent typhoon on October 4. Fluctuations in intensity soon followed as Krosa approached Taiwan, as the JMA upgraded it to 105 kt and the JTWC to a super typhoon early on October 5.

Current storm information

As of 1500 UTC October 5, the JMA reports Typhoon Krosa to be located near 22.4N 124.6E. The system has maximum 10-minute average winds of 105 kt (195 km/h, 120 mph), gusting to 150 kt (280 km/h, 175 mph). It has a minimum pressure of 925 hPa, and is moving north-northwest at 10 kt (20 km/h, 12 mph).

As of 1200 UTC, the JTWC reports Super Typhoon 17W to be located about 305 nm (565 km, 350 mi) SSW of Naha, Okinawa, with maximum 1-minute sustained winds of 130 kt (240 km/h, 150 mph), gusting to 160 kt (295 km/h, 185 mph). The system has a maximum associated wave height of 39 ft (11.8 m).

Tropical Depression

Tropical Depression TC
{{{image}}}
Current storm status
(JMA)
As of: 2100 UTC October 5
Location: 28.1N 171.2E
Winds: 30 kt (55 km/h, 35 mph) average (10-min mean)
gusting to 45 kt (80 km/h, 50 mph)
Pressure: 1000 hPa
Movement: W slowly
See more detailed information.

Current storm information

As of 2100 UTC October 5, the JMA reports Tropical Depression to be located near 28.1N 171.2E. The system has maximum 10-minute average winds of 30 kt (55 km/h, 35 mph), gusting to 45 kt (80 km/h, 50 mph). It has a minimum pressure of 1000 hPa, and is moving westward slowly.


Other storms

These systems were not officially named as tropical storms by the JMA, although the JMA might have monitored them as tropical depressions. They were, however, designated as tropical cyclones by the Philippines (PAGASA), China (CMA), Thailand (TMD), and/or the JTWC.

 TMD Tropical Depression

TMD Tropical Depression TD
96W INVEST 05012007.jpg
Duration May 1May 1, 2007
Intensity 30 kt[111], 1006 hPa[112]

On April 26, an area of disturbed weather formed east of the Malay Peninsula. On May 1, the Thai Meteorological Department (TMD) upgraded the same low pressure cell to a tropical depression in the Gulf of Thailand.[113] It made landfall 10 hours later in Amphoe Pathiu, Chumphon Province.[114] It then passed over the Isthmus of Kra into the Andaman Sea.

The TMD warned residents about heavy rainfall and possible flooding in western provinces during the system's passage. In Ratchaburi Province, disaster response teams prepared for the evacuation of settlements in mountaineous terrain on May 3.[115] The next day, Prachuap Khiri Khan Province was declared a disaster zone after low-lying areas were flooded with waters up to one metre deep. In the capital municipality, a prison was inundated, necessitating the evacuation of prisoners to Ratchaburi. In addition, a portion of rail was flooded, but train services were not disrupted. In Surat Thani Province, mudslides halted traffic in the municipal area. Multiple landslide warnings were also issued in other provinces.[116]

This system was not considered to be a tropical depression by any other agencies while in the Gulf of Thailand, but was tracked by the Naval Research Laboratory.

 JTWC Tropical Storm 06W

JTWC Tropical Storm 06W TS
TS 06W 04 aug 2007 0210Z.jpg
Duration August 2August 7, 2007
Intensity 35 kt (1-min), 996 hPa

An area of disturbed weather developed in the South China Sea on July 31. Despite strong wind shear in the area, the system gradually increased in organization as it remained nearly stationary, and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert on the system on August 2.[117] The JTWC classified the system as Tropical Depression 06W shortly after,[118] with the JMA designating it a tropical depression at the same time.[119] Despite strong wind shear in the area, the system slowly intensified as it meandered along the coast of Vietnam, and the JTWC upgraded it to a tropical storm early on August 4.[120] However, later that day, the JTWC downgraded the storm back to a depression due to the loss of most of the convection.[121]

At least 60 people died in Vietnam due to extensive floods .[122] Total rainfall from 06W in Vietnam throughout the course of the storm was over 24 inches (610 mm).[123] Total rainfall in Hainan during the passage of the tropical storm was 231.6mm.[124]

JTWC Tropical Depression 14W

JTWC Tropical Depression 14W TD
TD 14W 21 sept 2007 0034Z.jpg
Duration September 20September 21, 2007
Intensity 30kt (1-min), 1000 hPa

An area of disturbed weather formed about 460 nm west of Guam early on September 19. It was recognised as a minor tropical depression by the JMA later that day. On September 20, the JTWC initiated advisories on Tropical Depression 14W.[125] Initially forecast to become a tropical storm, it was impacted by strong vertical wind shear and degenerated into a remnant low on September 21.[126]

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